100 Ways to Give: Items for veterans

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GRCC’s veterans and student records offices and mathematics department are teaming up to collect items for veterans through December.

Items needed include:

  • $10 gift cards for places such as Meijer, McDonald’s and Wendy’s.
  • cologne, body wash and deodorant for both men and women.
  • AAA, C and D batteries.
  • lap blankets for both men and women.

You can bring items for any of the 100 Ways to Give projects to drop boxes at:

  • the enrollment center.
  • the student success center in Sneden Hall.
  • at Tassell M-TEC.
  • in the student life office at the Student Center.
  • the first-floor circulation desk at the library.

To see the full list of 100 Ways to Give projects, click here. When getting involved, don’t forget to share it on social media by using #GRCC100years and #100waystogive on Twitter and Instagram, and “Grand Rapids Community College” on Facebook.

 

Math Seminar is today

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department will host its next Mathematics Seminar on Thursday, November 20, 3:00-4:00 PM in 104 Cook. Our speaker will be GRCC Mathematics Instructor Alejandro Saldivar. The title and abstract for Alejandro’s talk may be found below.

This seminar will focus on a result that appears to be impossible: How can there be a one-to-one correspondence between the points on a line segment and the points in a square that has that line segment as its base? Those who attend can expect to have their intuition challenged and will be exposed to ideas that are at once surprising, powerful and beautiful. This talk is intended for anybody who likes and enjoys mathematics for mathematics’ sake; of course, all are welcome.

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 PM.

A Quest to find a One-to-One and Onto function from the line segment [0,1] to the square plane region [0,1]x[0,1]

Many theorems in mathematics address the existence or non-existence of mathematical objects such as solutions to equations; however, finding an actual and precise mathematical object can be an exciting and, at times frustrating, quest. In this seminar we will talk about one-to-one and onto functions between sets, and the challenges involved in finding a one-to-one and onto function. Along the way, we will discuss decimals extensively.

 

Math Seminar features Alejandro Saldivar

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department will host its next Mathematics Seminar on Thursday, November 20, 3:00-4:00 PM in 104 Cook. Our speaker will be GRCC Mathematics Instructor Alejandro Saldivar. The title and abstract for Alejandro’s talk may be found below.

This seminar will focus on a result that appears to be impossible: How can there be a one-to-one correspondence between the points on a line segment and the points in a square that has that line segment as its base? Those who attend can expect to have their intuition challenged and will be exposed to ideas that are at once surprising, powerful and beautiful. This talk is intended for anybody who likes and enjoys mathematics for mathematics’ sake; of course, all are welcome.

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 PM.

A Quest to find a One-to-One and Onto function from the line segment [0,1] to the square plane region [0,1]x[0,1]

Many theorems in mathematics address the existence or non-existence of mathematical objects such as solutions to equations; however, finding an actual and precise mathematical object can be an exciting and, at times frustrating, quest. In this seminar we will talk about one-to-one and onto functions between sets, and the challenges involved in finding a one-to-one and onto function. Along the way, we will discuss decimals extensively.

 

Math Seminar looks at line segments

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department will host its next Mathematics Seminar on Thursday, November 20, 3:00-4:00 PM in 104 Cook. Our speaker will be GRCC Mathematics Instructor Alejandro Saldivar. The title and abstract for Alejandro’s talk may be found below.

This seminar will focus on a result that appears to be impossible: How can there be a one-to-one correspondence between the points on a line segment and the points in a square that has that line segment as its base? Those who attend can expect to have their intuition challenged and will be exposed to ideas that are at once surprising, powerful and beautiful. This talk is intended for anybody who likes and enjoys mathematics for mathematics’ sake; of course, all are welcome.

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 PM.

A Quest to find a One-to-One and Onto function from the line segment [0,1] to the square plane region [0,1]x[0,1]

Many theorems in mathematics address the existence or non-existence of mathematical objects such as solutions to equations; however, finding an actual and precise mathematical object can be an exciting and, at times frustrating, quest. In this seminar we will talk about one-to-one and onto functions between sets, and the challenges involved in finding a one-to-one and onto function. Along the way, we will discuss decimals extensively.

 

John Dersch to speak at math seminar today

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department will host its next Mathematics Seminar on Wednesday, October 15, 3:00-4:00 PM in 215 Cook. Our speaker will be GRCC Mathematics Instructor John Dersch. The title and abstract for John’s talk may be found below.

Did you know that total enrollment in our mathematics classes once stood at 7, and that the cost of running classes with low enrollment has been a concern (to some) for at least 98 years? That we used to have a course called Math X? That during WWII the college nearly closed and we stopped offering Calculus for two years? That one of the most prominent mathematicians in the United States was significantly influenced by someone who helped create GRJC and eventually taught math for us? That the college once had yearbooks, and that in a ten-year a span two of them were dedicated to mathematics instructors? All this and more will be discussed. Expect a talk that is high on history and low on mathematical content; all are welcome.

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 PM.

100 Years of Mathematics at GRJC/CC

In Fall 1914 the GRJC Mathematics Department offered one math class, taught by one instructor to fewer than twenty students. One hundred years later we offer 22 courses, taught by approximately 75 faculty to more than 5000 students each semester. We’ll discuss the people and courses that got us to where we are today. Emphasis will be on personalities, course development and anecdotes.

Math seminar looks back at 100 years of history

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department will host its next Mathematics Seminar on Wednesday, October 15, 3:00-4:00 PM in 215 Cook. Our speaker will be GRCC Mathematics Instructor John Dersch. The title and abstract for John’s talk may be found below.

Did you know that total enrollment in our mathematics classes once stood at 7, and that the cost of running classes with low enrollment has been a concern (to some) for at least 98 years? That we used to have a course called Math X? That during WWII the college nearly closed and we stopped offering Calculus for two years? That one of the most prominent mathematicians in the United States was significantly influenced by someone who helped create GRJC and eventually taught math for us? That the college once had yearbooks, and that in a ten-year a span two of them were dedicated to mathematics instructors? All this and more will be discussed. Expect a talk that is high on history and low on mathematical content; all are welcome.

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 PM.

100 Years of Mathematics at GRJC/CC

In Fall 1914 the GRJC Mathematics Department offered one math class, taught by one instructor to fewer than twenty students. One hundred years later we offer 22 courses, taught by approximately 75 faculty to more than 5000 students each semester. We’ll discuss the people and courses that got us to where we are today. Emphasis will be on personalities, course development and anecdotes.

Math seminar looks back at 100 years

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department will host its next Mathematics Seminar on Wednesday, October 15, 3:00-4:00 PM in 215 Cook. Our speaker will be GRCC Mathematics Instructor John Dersch. The title and abstract for John’s talk may be found below.

Did you know that total enrollment in our mathematics classes once stood at 7, and that the cost of running classes with low enrollment has been a concern (to some) for at least 98 years? That we used to have a course called Math X? That during WWII the college nearly closed and we stopped offering Calculus for two years? That one of the most prominent mathematicians in the United States was significantly influenced by someone who helped create GRJC and eventually taught math for us? That the college once had yearbooks, and that in a ten-year a span two of them were dedicated to mathematics instructors? All this and more will be discussed. Expect a talk that is high on history and low on mathematical content; all are welcome.

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 PM.

100 Years of Mathematics at GRJC/CC

In Fall 1914 the GRJC Mathematics Department offered one math class, taught by one instructor to fewer than twenty students. One hundred years later we offer 22 courses, taught by approximately 75 faculty to more than 5000 students each semester. We’ll discuss the people and courses that got us to where we are today. Emphasis will be on personalities, course development and anecdotes.

Math seminar is today

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department will host its first Mathematics Seminar of the 2014-2015 academic year on Thursday, September 18, 3:00- 4:00 PM in 104 Cook. Our presenter, Duy Duong-Tran, is a former GRCC student currently at Western Michigan University double-majoring in Mathematics and Industrial-Entrepreneurial Engineering. He will discuss applications of mathematics in the field of engineering. See below for title and abstract.

This talk should be of interest to students considering a career in engineering or applied mathematics, or to anyone who would like to learn more about real-world applications of mathematics. A working knowledge of Intermediate Algebra (Ma 107) would be helpful. As always, everyone is welcome to attend GRCC Mathematics Seminars.

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 PM.

Mathematics in the World of Industrial Engineers

The influence of mathematics in our society is amazing. For example, mathematics plays a role in the infrastructure of the automobile industry (aerodynamic simulation through the use of math modeling), bioengineering (footwear design through piecewise linear interpolation and modeling), and the aviation industry (cubic spline interpolation at Boeing Research and Development to replace “lofting” technique).

This seminar will discuss the use of mathematics in the world of industrial engineering. Specifically, we will talk about Optimization Problems in the industry using Linear Programming (LP). Surprisingly enough, LP problems often do not employ any computer algorithm techniques, and most mathematics students are exposed to LP problems early in their careers without an official introduction to the topic. Well-known LP techniques can be applied to scheduling, transportation, assignment, capacity planning, network optimization models, project management, facility planning, and capital budgeting problems.

All of these reside under the applied mathematics field called Operations Research (OR). We will go through the technique of solving a couple of problems, and will be surprised at how much impact OR (or more generally mathematics) has upon the success of a manufacturing based corporation.

Students with knowledge of Intermediate Algebra (Ma 107) or above are encouraged to attend; no knowledge of calculus is necessary. The seminar is also designed to encourage students with a passion for both mathematics and engineering to move forward with confidence.

Math seminar scheduled for September 18

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department will host its first Mathematics Seminar of the 2014-2015 academic year on Thursday, September 18, 3:00- 4:00 PM in 104 Cook. Our presenter, Duy Duong-Tran, is a former GRCC student currently at Western Michigan University double-majoring in Mathematics and Industrial-Entrepreneurial Engineering. He will discuss applications of mathematics in the field of engineering. See below for title and abstract.

This talk should be of interest to students considering a career in engineering or applied mathematics, or to anyone who would like to learn more about real-world applications of mathematics. A working knowledge of Intermediate Algebra (Ma 107) would be helpful. As always, everyone is welcome to attend GRCC Mathematics Seminars.

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 PM.

Mathematics in the World of Industrial Engineers

The influence of mathematics in our society is amazing. For example, mathematics plays a role in the infrastructure of the automobile industry (aerodynamic simulation through the use of math modeling), bioengineering (footwear design through piecewise linear interpolation and modeling), and the aviation industry (cubic spline interpolation at Boeing Research and Development to replace “lofting” technique).

This seminar will discuss the use of mathematics in the world of industrial engineering. Specifically, we will talk about Optimization Problems in the industry using Linear Programming (LP). Surprisingly enough, LP problems often do not employ any computer algorithm techniques, and most mathematics students are exposed to LP problems early in their careers without an official introduction to the topic. Well-known LP techniques can be applied to scheduling, transportation, assignment, capacity planning, network optimization models, project management, facility planning, and capital budgeting problems.

All of these reside under the applied mathematics field called Operations Research (OR). We will go through the technique of solving a couple of problems, and will be surprised at how much impact OR (or more generally mathematics) has upon the success of a manufacturing based corporation.

Students with knowledge of Intermediate Algebra (Ma 107) or above are encouraged to attend; no knowledge of calculus is necessary. The seminar is also designed to encourage students with a passion for both mathematics and engineering to move forward with confidence.

Seminar highlights role of math in engineering

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department will host its first Mathematics Seminar of the 2014-2015 academic year on Thursday, September 18, 3:00- 4:00 PM in 104 Cook. Our presenter, Duy Duong-Tran, is a former GRCC student currently at Western Michigan University double-majoring in Mathematics and Industrial-Entrepreneurial Engineering. He will discuss applications of mathematics in the field of engineering. See below for title and abstract.

This talk should be of interest to students considering a career in engineering or applied mathematics, or to anyone who would like to learn more about real-world applications of mathematics. A working knowledge of Intermediate Algebra (Ma 107) would be helpful. As always, everyone is welcome to attend GRCC Mathematics Seminars.

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 PM.

Mathematics in the World of Industrial Engineers

The influence of mathematics in our society is amazing. For example, mathematics plays a role in the infrastructure of the automobile industry (aerodynamic simulation through the use of math modeling), bioengineering (footwear design through piecewise linear interpolation and modeling), and the aviation industry (cubic spline interpolation at Boeing Research and Development to replace “lofting” technique).

This seminar will discuss the use of mathematics in the world of industrial engineering. Specifically, we will talk about Optimization Problems in the industry using Linear Programming (LP). Surprisingly enough, LP problems often do not employ any computer algorithm techniques, and most mathematics students are exposed to LP problems early in their careers without an official introduction to the topic. Well-known LP techniques can be applied to scheduling, transportation, assignment, capacity planning, network optimization models, project management, facility planning, and capital budgeting problems.

All of these reside under the applied mathematics field called Operations Research (OR). We will go through the technique of solving a couple of problems, and will be surprised at how much impact OR (or more generally mathematics) has upon the success of a manufacturing based corporation.

Students with knowledge of Intermediate Algebra (Ma 107) or above are encouraged to attend; no knowledge of calculus is necessary. The seminar is also designed to encourage students with a passion for both mathematics and engineering to move forward with confidence.