Fall menu special at the Heritage next week

The Heritage is hosting a Fall Menu Special on October 7th (Tuesday) and 8th (Wednesday). This menu includes a four course meal for $13.95! Please call 3700 to make a reservation.

Soup: Acorn and butternut squash soup, with crème fraiche and toasted pumpkin seeds

Salad: Salad of caramelized walnuts, roasted fresh pears, crisp apples, and arugula with a grain mustard Stilton dressing

Hot Plates: Cinnamon and Thyme pot roasted pork loin, served on a root vegetable hash, creamy Yukon gold potatoes, apple pumpkin butter, and Calvados Au Jus

Dessert: Apple Normandy Table side

$13.95 per person.

100 Ways to Give: Heritage lunches to benefit Kids’ Food Basket

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The Secchia Institute for Culinary Education has developed a tasty 100 Ways to Give project: For four Fridays throughout the semester, The Heritage lunch menu will feature a special dish celebrating the different decades. These dishes will be prepared by Chef Campbell and his students, and proceeds from the sale of these special menu items will go to Kids’ Food Basket.

We celebrated 1914 and the “Teen Decade” with Saddle of Veal Prince Orloff on September 19. On October 3, the special dish is Roasted and Braised Pigeons with Raisins and Rosti Potatoes, in celebration of the 1920s.

The Heritage serves lunch from 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays. To learn about the other “decade dishes,” click here.

The SICE experts have shared some background and a recipe:

The term “Epigram” has been around for a centuries and one of the earliest recordings relates to a dish called “veal hocks à l’epigramme,” which appeared in La Varenne’s 17th-century cookbook, “Le Cuisinier François.” Over the years, the method of cooking has been applied to many meats, including lamb and pork, and the way it was prepared has also changed during the years.

The most popular modern dish is Epigram of lamb, which uses lamb belly, this alters people’s perception of the dense, fatty cut of lamb by transforming it into thin, breaded cutlets. “Epigram” is prepared from a lesser cut of the animal that is braised slowly in savory broth until very tender, it is then cooled and cut into an attractive shape. These circles or triangles of meat are then brush with mustard and seasoned, passed through a pane and pan fried golden brown. The result is a succulent tender piece of highly flavored meat with a very crisp and crunchy exterior. In our case for this dish, we have confit the meat instead of braising, which even adds more to the flavor and texture. Using the confit method does have its disadvantages, in that the meat tends to not stick together as well as with braised meats because of the absence of gelatin. A little glace with agar added to the pulled confit meat before setting overnight will help solve this issue.

The French word confit means “preserved,” and the process was created to preserve a variety of meats and poultry. The most traditionally ingredients associated with confit are goose, duck and pork. The process involves curing the meat in salt, then poaching it slowly in fat, and storing it covered with the fat until you are ready to eat it, or use it in further cooking. The technique evolved over thousands of years in cultures around the world and is easily recognized in many cuisines to this day. Curing the meat in salt makes the water in it unavailable to microorganisms which inhibit bacterial growth slowing down spoilage. Covering the meat with at least an inch of fat after it has been cooked keeps air from reaching it, further retarding the tendency to spoil. If the meat has been properly cured, a confit will keep in a cool, dark place (a cellar or refrigerator) for six months. You can also renew a confit after the first six months by re-cooking it, in which case, it will last for another four to six months. For best, flavor, however, the confit should be consumed within three to five months of the initial cooking.

For the confit

Pigeon legs

Kosher salt spun with parsley and sage in the robot coupe

Chicken fat

Duck fat

Peppercorns

  1. Lightly dust the legs with the salt and sit a room temp for 1 hour
  2. Repeat the dusting and allow to sit for 30 minutes
  3. Wash thoroughly of all salt and cover with equal quantities of the fats
  4. Sprinkle with peppercorns and cover tightly with tine foil
  5. Cook slowly at 250 F for 2.5 hours until fork tender
  6. Allow the fat to cool until the meat is cool enough to handle
  7. Flake the meat of the bone
  8. Strain the fat and separate the liquid at the bottom
  9. Combine that liquid with the meat and press into a pan about 1 inch deep
  10. Cool overnight
  11. Cut into shapes and pane

For the pigeon breast marinade

1 T fine diced shallot

1 T fine diced garlic

4 bay leaves

½ C juniper berries

Zest of two lemons

Zest of one orange

½ C olive oil

2 C red wine

  1. Combine all the ingredients except the oil and bring to the boil
  2. Cool and add the olive oil
  3. Marinade the breasts overnight
  4. This marinade 20 breasts

 For cooking the breasts

  1. Drain the breasts and season well with salt and black pepper
  2. Sear the breasts in hot olive oil
  3. Roast medium rare to order and serve whole

 For the golden Raisin sauce

4 Q. pigeon stock

4 oz. brown roux

4 C. red wine boiled for 2 minutes

2 C. Port

1 ea. Jar redcurrant jelly

2 C. golden raisins

  1. Add the roux to the stock and the red wine and port
  2. Reduce by half
  3. Add the redcurrant jelly
  4. Add the raisins and allow to stand overnight

To serve the dish we will use:

 Raisin sauce

Roasted breast of pigeon

Pan fried Epigram of pigeon

Rosti potatoes

Broccoli-rabe

Rutabaga tourne

Carrot potato puree

 

 

100 Ways to Give: special meal benefits Kids Food Basket

For four Fridays throughout the semester, The Heritage lunch menu will feature a special dish celebrating the different decades. These dishes will be prepared by Chef Campbell and his students, and proceeds from the sale of these special menu items will go to Kids’ Food Basket.

Chef Campbell and Lorna Logan, a visiting chef and graduate of Elwood College Cupar Fife in Scotland, prepared Saddle of Veal Prince Orloff for diners at lunch today. The next benefit lunch, on October 3, celebrates the 1920s: Braised Pigeon with Raisins and Rosti Potatoes. Click here to learn more.

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100 Ways to Give: special Heritage lunches to benefit Kids’ Food Basket

ways-to-give-fb-image

The Secchia Institute for Culinary Education has developed a tasty 100 Ways to Give project: For four Fridays throughout the semester, The Heritage lunch menu will feature a special dish celebrating the different decades. These dishes will be prepared by Chef Campbell and his students, and proceeds from the sale of these special menu items will go to Kids’ Food Basket.

On September 19, the special dish — celebrating 1914 and the “Teen Decade” is Saddle of Veal Prince Orloff, which was popular in Europe and American during that time. It’s a French-Russian dish from classical French haute or high cuisine. There are many stories associated with the origin of this dish: The most famous is that Urbain Dubois, a 19th-century French chef, named the dish in honor of his employer, Prince Orloff, the Russian ambassador to France. A second story states that it was created even earlier by the much more famous Marie-Antoine Carême, who was called “the king of chefs, and the chef of kings.” A third story attributes its invention to a French chef who worked in Russia for Prince Grigoryevich Orlov, a one-time lover of Catherine the Great.

The Heritage serves lunch from 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays. To learn about the other “decade dishes,” click here.

100 Ways to Give: Heritage lunches to benefit Kids’ Food Basket

ways-to-give-fb-image

The Secchia Institute for Culinary Education has developed a tasty 100 Ways to Give project: For four Fridays throughout the semester, The Heritage lunch menu will feature a special dish celebrating the different decades. These dishes will be prepared by Chef Campbell and his students, and proceeds from the sale of these special menu items will go to Kids’ Food Basket.

On September 19, the special dish — celebrating 1914 and the “Teen Decade” is Saddle of Veal Prince Orloff, which was popular in Europe and American during that time. It’s a French-Russian dish from classical French haute or high cuisine. There are many stories associated with the origin of this dish: The most famous is that Urbain Dubois, a 19th-century French chef, named the dish in honor of his employer, Prince Orloff, the Russian ambassador to France. A second story states that it was created even earlier by the much more famous Marie-Antoine Carême, who was called “the king of chefs, and the chef of kings.” A third story attributes its invention to a French chef who worked in Russia for Prince Grigoryevich Orlov, a one-time lover of Catherine the Great.

The Heritage serves lunch from 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays. To learn about the other “decade dishes,” click here.

Chef Campbell has shared the recipe:

Saddle of Veal Prince Orlof

For the Veal

1 ea. veal loin bone in and trimmed

1 T salt

1 T ground black pepper

¼ C. vegetable oil

2 T unsalted butter

2 Q. mirpoix

1 C. white wine

3 Q. brown veal stock

  1. Season the meat well
  2. Sear the meat well until golden brown
  3. Sear the mirpoix golden brown
  4. Place the veal on the mirpoix and cook to and internal temp 145 F°
  5. Remove the loin and allow to rest
  6. Add the wine to the roasting pan and deglaze
  7. Add the stock and bring to a boil
  8. Strain the liquid and allow to chill
  9. Remove the fat and reduce by half
  10. Thicken slightly with arrowroot slurry

For the Soubise

3 C. sauce béchamel

½ C. cooked long-grain white rice

½ C. veal stock

2 T. butter

1 lb. onions sliced fine

White seasoning

  1. Stew the onions in the butter for 1 hour until very soft with no color
  2. Add the remaining ingredients and season well
  3. Bring to a boil and allow to cook for ten minutes
  4. Puree until very smooth
  5. This sauce should be quite thick

For the duxelle

1 pound mushrooms, minced fine

3 tablespoons unsalted butter

½ C. shallots very fine dice

2 T black truffles chopped fine

1/4 cup heavy cream

White seasoning

  1. Sweat the shallot in the butter until very soft
  2. Add the mushroom and cook until dry
  3. Add the remaining ingredients and cook until dry
  4. Season highly with hot sauce and white seasoning

For the Mornay sauce

3 C. sauce béchamel

1 oz. coarsely grated Gruyère 1/2 teaspoon salt

4 oz. grated parmesan

1/8 teaspoon black pepper

1/8 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg

  1. Heat the sauce until almost boiling and add the remaining ingredients until they are well incorporated

For the assemble of the dish

This may be done 2 hours before service

  1. Remove the loins from the bone and carve into slices allowing three per portion
  2. Shingle the slices separated by Soubise and duxelle
  3. Coat the whole with Sauce Mornay and sprinkle with parmesan
  4. Fire a portion to order in a very hot oven until fully cooked and golden brown

The usual accompaniments for this dish are pommes Parisienne and haricot beans Tourangelle

 

Heritage is open for lunch, dinner; free desserts today

The Heritage Restaurant is open for lunch and dinner now. Lunch reservation hours are 11:15 am to 12:45 pm and dinner reservation hours are 5:30 pm- 7 PM Tuesday through Friday. Students are eager to serve you in their classroom. Any staff that dines in the restaurant will receive a complimentary dessert prepared by Chef Gilles and his pastry class today, September 5th. Please go online

http://grcc.edu/secchiainstituteforculinaryeducation/secchiainstituteheritagerestaurant to make a reservation or stop in.

Our menu

Cheese and Wine soup highlights the flavors of Parmesan, Fontina, Gruyere and Stilton cheeses, cleverly finished with a combination of dry white and sweet red wines all topped with a crispy garlicky crouton $3.95

Gluten Free Salmon leek crab bisque finished with a creamy rich shellfish broth, fragrant rice, sweet potato all topped with fresh fine herb $3.95

Pan fried sage Parisienne style dumplings sautéed with baby shrimp, spinach, grape tomatoes and lemon tarragon Aigre Doux $4.95

Italian cheese fritter “polpette di ricotta” style served with fresh house tomato ketchup and garlic aioli $4.95

Apple cider ginger braised pork shoulder with toasted kamut raisin pilaf, broccoli, crisp bacon, tomato chimichurri dressing, crunchy bread flute and “oeuf sur le plat” $9.95

Beef tenderloin ribbons “Straccetti style” scorched in olive oil, garlic and rosemary and served on roman style gnocchi, glazed asparagus, pizziola sauce and topped with balsamic drizzle $10.95

Sautéed hazelnut buttermilk crisped chicken fillet served with buttered asparagus, butternut squash puree, red pepper fingerling potato hash and sauce Mousseline $9.95

Gluten Free Roasted lime scented scallop served with celery root gastric, rosemary farinata, sweet and sour beet puree, glazed radish and buttered turnips $10.95

Pan fried trout fillet meuniere style served on a Swiss chard baby spinach sauté, fine green beans, glazed baby carrots, corn coulis and basil fondue $9.95

V Gluten Free Umbrian stacked salad loaded with roasted peppers, grilled summer squash, roasted cauliflower, grape tomatoes, toasted almonds, garlic corn wafer and pomegranate goats cheese cream Haydari Half $4.95 Full $8.95

Gluten Free Karlee and Steve’s blackberry avocado salad with parmesan, carrot marmellata, yellow grape tomatoes and creamed blackberry drizzle Half $4.95 Full $8.95

V Gluten Free Warm caramelized orange salad topped with toasted pistachio, creamy Turkish haydari, cucumber curls, kalamata olives, fresh roasted pears, baby spinach and orange blossom champagne vinegar coconut dressing Half $4.95 Full $8.95

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GRCC In the News, 8-6-14

Judges to take on entries in Grand Cocktail 2014

Aug. 5, 2014; WZZM

GRAND RAPIDS (WZZM) — Restaurant Week in Grand Rapids begins next week, but one part of the annual event is being held today.

… Today’s competition is from 12-4 p.m. at The Heritage Restaurant at Grand Rapids Community College, 151 Fountain Street NE.

Circle Theatre’s upcoming production of “Spamalot” promises laughs

Aug. 5, 2014; therapidian.org

Circle Theatre will be performing “Monty Python’s Spamalot” from August 7-23. Performances will be held at the Aquinas College Performing Arts Center, and tickets can be purchased either online or by calling the Circle Theatre Box Office.

… “All I can say about these cast members is that they are talented, talented, talented,” says director Tom Kaechele. “They’re all singer-actor-dancer types and they are just really on their game with this show.”

… Kaechele, who also serves as Theater Program Director for Grand Rapids Community College, is no stranger to Circle Theatre. He has been involved with the company since the early ’80s, when he started out acting in Circle Theatre shows. He estimates that Spamalot is the 16th production he has directed for Circle Theatre since 2002.

For those with disabilities, celebration marks progress and resolve to keep moving forward

Aug. 5, 2014; ahealthiermichigan.org (newsletter sponsored by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan)

A showcase of talent, community, and ability lit up Grand Rapids Rosa Parks Circle on Tuesday.

… Peter Gordon, Director of Jabez Ministries, a ministry for Grand Rapids Community College students with disabilities, said the passing of the ADA was a big step forward.

Heritage creates vegan meal with wine pairings

Vegans! Wine lovers! GRCC’s Heritage restaurant has created a meal just for you on February 25. For reservations, call 234-3700 or click here.

Heritage offers lunch special

Today will be the last day of service for this seven weeks. We will reopen on March 18th. Any staff member who comes in for lunch today, February 21st, will receive either a complimentary cup of coffee OR dessert, your choice. You may call 3700 or make reservations on line. http://cms.grcc.edu/secchiainstituteforculinaryeducation/secchiainstituteheritagerestaurant

Students look forward to serving you in our classroom.

Heritage designs meal for vegans, wine lovers

Vegans! Wine lovers! GRCC’s Heritage restaurant has created a meal just for you on February 25. For reservations, call 234-3700 or click here.

Heritage hosts vegan meal with wine pairings

Vegans! Wine lovers! GRCC’s Heritage restaurant has created a meal just for you on February 25. For reservations, call 234-3700 or click here.

Make reservations for lobster boil

Join the Heritage Restaurant

for an

 Old Fashion Lobster Boil

December 3rd at 6:00 p.m.

 

Featuring:

Whole Maine Lobster (1 ¾ lb.)

New England Clam Chowder

Grilled Sweet Corn on the Cob

Cornbread

Boiled Potatoes

Mussels and Little Neck Clams

$38.99 per person

 (plus tax and gratuity)

Not Available With Any Other Discount

 Beer, Wine, and Dessert

 (available for purchase)

 For reservations, please call 616-234-3700 by November 25th or

Make reservations online at http://www.grcc.edu/Heritage