Posted tagged ‘Calkins Science Center’

GRCC seismometer records last Friday’s Anchorage earthquake

December 3, 2018

At 8:29 a.m. this past Friday, November 30, a magnitude 7 earthquake sent Anchorage residents scurrying out of buildings and under desks. Six minutes later, GRCC’s seismometer picked up the primary waves that traveled from Alaska to Michigan at a speed of over 13,000 miles per hour. There are preliminary reports of damage in Alaska’s largest city and the surrounding communities. A Tsunami warning was issued and then canceled later in the day.

A screen capture of the GRMI Seismic record of the magnitude 7 earthquake in Alaska on Friday morning, November 30, 2018. Two red arrows in the lower right corner of the image indicate arrival of the P-body wave and the surface waves.

The image above shows GRMI’s seismic record of the magnitude 7 earthquake in Alaska on Friday morning, November 30, 2018. The two red arrows indicate arrival of the P-body wave and the surface waves.

Calkins Science Center at GRCC hosts a seismometer (GRMI) that is part of the MIQuakes network, a group of high schools, community colleges and universities in Michigan that host seismometers designed to record earthquake activity both locally and worldwide. The stations are sponsored by IRIS – Incorporated Research Institutes in Seismology and MESTA – the Michigan Earth Science Teachers Association.

If you are interested in or other earthquakes recorded by the GRCC seismometer, you can find them on the MIQuakes website.

GRCC Science Talks Continue Today with “Species Conservation”

November 5, 2018

An underwater photograph of manatees.

Species Conservation: How we got here and what can still be done

  • TODAY, November 5, 2018, at 3:45 p.m.
  • Calkins Science Center auditorium, Room 348

Professor Forbes will examine some of the reasons that animal and plant species are endangered today, the current status of species worldwide, nationally and in Michigan, as well as some possible strategies to save some of these species as well as humanity.

Dr. Greg Forbes, evolutionary biologist and certified wildlife biologist.

Future GRCC Science Talks will include:

  • 02/21/2019: “Epigenetics and Colon Cancer: A tale of mice, microbes, and methyl groups” – 4 p.m., Calkins Science Center auditorium, Room 348
  • 03/25/2019: “Gene Modifications: CRISPR” – 3:45 p.m., Calkins Science Center auditorium, Room 348

Grand Rapids Community College Science Talks are open to the public, and light refreshments will be served.

Please email timothyperiard@grcc.edu with any questions.

GRCC Science Talks Continue Monday with ‘Species Conservation’

October 30, 2018

An underwater photograph of manatees.

Species Conservation: How we got here and what can still be done

  • Monday, November 5, 2018, at 3:45 p.m.
  • Calkins Science Center auditorium, Room 348

Professor Forbes will examine some of the reasons that animal and plant species are endangered today, the current status of species worldwide, nationally and in Michigan, as well as some possible strategies to save some of these species as well as humanity.

Dr. Greg Forbes, evolutionary biologist and certified wildlife biologist.

Future GRCC Science Talks will include:

  • 02/21/2019: “Epigenetics and Colon Cancer: A tale of mice, microbes, and methyl groups” – 4 p.m., Calkins Science Center auditorium, Room 348
  • 03/25/2019: “Gene Modifications: CRISPR” – 3:45 p.m., Calkins Science Center auditorium, Room 348

Grand Rapids Community College Science Talks are open to the public, and light refreshments will be served.

Please email timothyperiard@grcc.edu with any questions.

Community Science Day on November 17

October 24, 2018

Poster for the GRCC's Community Science day. Poster is purple with scientific doodles along the edges. The text reads: "Grand Rapids Community College Community Science Day. Saturday, Nov. 17, 2018. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Calkins Science Center and Cook Hall on GRCC’s Main Campus. Open to all ages. Free, interactive, science, and health-related activities. The first 300 guests will receive a FREE parking pass for the GRCC parking ramps."

October Mind-Body Wellness Events from Counseling & Career Development

September 27, 2018

Counseling & Career Development’s Mind-Body Wellness Series continues this October with several more free events. All GRCC students, faculty, and staff are welcome. Staff can receive professional development credit for their participation. Questions? Email enisley@grcc.edu

October Classes:

Mindfulness Meditation

  • Mondays in October, 12-12:30 p.m., Meditation and Prayer Room, Main Floor Library and Learning Commons

Did you know that regular practice of mindfulness meditation can reduce stress, improve attention and concentration, increase feelings of connectedness, and may strengthen the immune system and improve stress-related physical and mental health conditions? Want to check it out for yourself? Join us for any of our weekly mindfulness meditation sessions to learn how to meditate or build on any previous meditation experience you may have. GRCC counselor, Emily Nisley, will facilitate sessions using a variety of common mindfulness meditation exercises. Our practice will be secular; no particular religious or spiritual beliefs are required. Chairs and floor seating are available; you’re welcome to bring a mat, cushion, towel, and/or blanket for more comfortable floor seating if desired.

Tai Chi & Tea

  • Tuesdays in October, 12-1 p.m., Student Center, Room 336

Originally developed in ancient China, tai chi is an exercise with benefits for the mind and body. Regular practice of tai chi’s slow, continuous movements with coordinated breathing and mental focus can decrease feelings of stress, improve mood, and increase strength, flexibility, and balance. The tai chi style we’ll practice was designed to be safe and gentle; it can even be done seated if needed. GRCC counselor, Emily Nisley, will lead the sessions, with about 45 minutes of tai chi, followed by time to enjoy a cup of tea together if you’d like. No experience necessary. Clothes you can move in and flat-soled shoes are recommended. Those with a health condition should consult their health care provider before beginning tai chi.

How to Feel Happier

  • Wednesday, October 10, 1:30-2 p.m., Calkins Science Center, Room 201
  • Thursday, October 25, 2-2:30 p.m., Cook Hall, Room 511

Some may think that happiness depends on life circumstances or on being born with a cheerful disposition, but decades of scientific research has shown that we can boost our own happiness. Using simple practices, we can increase our positive experiences and emotions, and even “rewire” our brains for greater happiness. In this 30-minute workshop, we’ll identify several of these happiness habits and share tips for practice. Light refreshments will be served.

 

All GRCC students, faculty, & staff are welcome at these FREE events. Questions? (616) 234-4130 enisley@grcc.edu grcc.edu/counseling. Those in need of accommodations, please contact DSS in advance at (616) 234-4140.

Event today: GRCC Science Talks “Unlocking the Sun”

September 17, 2018

An image of the sun using Spectroscopy. The sun is depicted in shades of green, brown, and blue.

Unlocking the Sun: Spectroscopy in the 1800s

  • TODAY, September 17, 2018, at 3:45 p.m.
  • Calkins Science Center auditorium, Room 348

Have you ever wondered how we know what the sun is made of, even though it’s too hot to visit?

The story of how we discovered the chemical makeup of our own star combines chemistry, physics, and astronomy in a tale of mystery, far-flung expeditions, and unexpected discoveries. After an overview of spectroscopy, assistant professor Lauren Woolsey will take us through the secrets of the sun from this turning point in science history.

Dr. Woolsey is a Harvard-trained expert in astronomy, solar physics, and exoplanets.

Future GRCC Science Talks will include:

  • 11/05/2018: “Species Conservation: How we got here and what can still be done” – 3:45 p.m., Calkins Science Center auditorium, Room 348
  • 02/21/2019: “Epigenetics and Colon Cancer: A tale of mice, microbes, and methyl groups” – 4 p.m., Calkins Science Center auditorium, Room 348
  • 03/25/2019: “Gene Modifications: CRISPR” – 3:45 p.m., Calkins Science Center auditorium, Room 348

Grand Rapids Community College Science Talks are open to the public, and light refreshments will be served.

Please email timothyperiard@grcc.edu with any questions.

GRCC Science Talks to tackle the Sun, species conservation in new lecture series

August 24, 2018

A new series of presentations on a variety of scientific topics begins this academic year. This lecture series is called ‘GRCC Science Talks.’ These lectures are free and open to the public. There will also be light refreshments available. Here are the first two presentations that may be of interest to you and your students this fall 2018 semester:

Unlocking the Sun: Spectroscopy in the 1800s

  • Who: Dr. Lauren Woolsey
  • When: Monday, September 17, 2018, at 3:45 p.m.
  • Where: Calkins Science Center (CSC) Auditorium (Room 348)
  • Description: Have you ever wondered how we know what the Sun is made of, even though it is far too hot for humans to visit? The story of how we discovered the chemical makeup of our own star combines chemistry, physics, and astronomy in a tale of mystery, far-flung expeditions, and unexpected discoveries. After an overview of spectroscopy for general audiences, GRCC Assistant Professor, Dr. Lauren Woolsey will take us through the secrets of the Sun from this turning point in science history.

Species Conservation: How We Got Here and What Can Still Be Done

  • Who: Dr. Greg Forbes
  • When: Monday, November 5, 2018, at 3:45 p.m.
  • Where: Calkins Science Center (CSC) Auditorium (Room 348)
  • Description: An examination of the reasons that animal and plant species are endangered today, the current status of species worldwide, nationally and in Michigan as well as some possible strategies to save some of these species as well as humanity. Dr. Forbes is an evolutionary biologist and a certified wildlife biologist with research experience

We look forward to participating in these events with you and our students. Please email Tim Periard (timothyperiard@grcc.edu) with any questions.

GRCC seismometer records four magnitude 6 earthquakes this August

August 17, 2018

GRCC’s Calkins Science Center hosts a seismometer that’s part of the MIQuakes network, a group of Michigan high schools, community colleges and universities that host seismometers recording earthquake activity worldwide.

GRCC’s seismometer — GRMI — has picked up four earthquakes so far this month that were equal to or greater than magnitude 6:

On Aug. 5 at 11:46 a.m. Coordinated Universal Time, a magnitude 6.9 earthquake was generated near Pulau Lombok, Indonesia.  Our seismometer recorded the earthquake 20 minutes later — the red arrow shows the arrival of the primary wave:

Image of the seismometer recording of the August 5 earthquake near Indonesia.

On Aug. 12, GRMI picked up two earthquakes —  a magnitude 6.4 and 6 —  both from northern Alaska. The primary waves from the Alaska earthquakes only took six minutes to arrive at the GRMI station.

Image of the seismometer recording of two earthquakes on August 12 from northern Alaska.

Finally, on Aug. 15, a magnitude 6.6 earthquake shook the Tanaga Volcano in the Aleutian Islands and was picked up by GRMI 10 minutes later.

Image of the seismometer recording of the August 15 earthquake near the Aleutian Islands.

Mechanical cooling issue in Calkins Science Center

June 14, 2018

Facilities is currently addressing a mechanical cooling issue in Calkins Science Center. Parts to make repairs to the system are expected to arrive Friday morning, and repairs will commence the same day.

Stop-gap measures are being taken to the extent possible to control temperatures until repairs are made.  In the meantime, occupants may experience warm temperatures through the end of the week.

 

Hawaii earthquake recorded on Calkins Center Seismograph

May 8, 2018

The dramatic events taking place in Hawai`i manifested here in West Michigan as the GRCC seismometer (GRMI) recorded the magnitude 6.9 earthquake on the Big Island of Hawai`i. On May 1st, a series of earthquakes heralded an intrusion of magma into the lower flanks of Kilauea Volcano on the Big Island. Cracks and fissures opened in Leilani Estates, a subdivision close to the town of Pahoa, which was previously threatened by lava flows in 2014. On May 3rd, lava began erupting from fissures in Leilani estates and to date, have destroyed 35 homes and forced the evacuation of over a thousand residents. Earthquakes generated by this activity include the magnitude 6.9 earthquake, recorded by GRMI. This is the largest earthquake in Hawai`i since the 1975.

For more information about the earthquake go to the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology.

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