Posted tagged ‘Mathematics Seminar’

Mathematics Seminar TODAY in 103 Cook

April 17, 2018

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is hosting its last Mathematics Seminar of 2017-2018 today, Tuesday, April 17, 3:00-4:00 p.m. in 103 Cook.

Our speaker, former GRCC student and current GRCC tutor Jeff Powers, will discuss the mathematics and science of Archimedes.  For the title and abstract of Jeff’s talk, please see below.

The mathematical and scientific accomplishments of Archimedes are impressive in their scope, depth and detail, often anticipating the work of others by many centuries.  This seminar will be accessible to everyone, regardless of their background in mathematics, and should also be of interest to those who enjoy history, astronomy, physics and science in general.  All are welcome.

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 PM.

“Archimedes: The Sand Reckoner

“There are some, King Gelon, who believe that the number of the sand is infinite in multitude…” begins The Sand Reckoner, a 3rd-century BCE manuscript by Archimedes of Syracuse (287-212 BCE). Limited by Greek numerals, Archimedes sought a new number system capable of expressing quantities larger than the amount of sand that could fill up the universe. Of course, to do this, he had to first determine the size of the universe. The Sand Reckoner is significant not only for the extraordinary mathematics it contains, but also for its profound insights into the history of science. It cites the earliest account we have of a heliocentric solar system, contains adjustments for solar parallax and the anatomy of a human eye, and is regarded as the world’s first research-expository paper. This seminar showcases Archimedes’ genius via a detailed analysis of The Sand Reckoner, demonstrating his place as the greatest mathematician of antiquity.

April Mathematics Seminar tomorrow

April 16, 2018

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is hosting its last Mathematics Seminar of 2017-2018 tomorrow, Tuesday, April 17, 3-4 p.m. in 103 Cook.

Our speaker, former GRCC student and current GRCC tutor Jeff Powers, will discuss the mathematics and science of Archimedes.  For the title and abstract of Jeff’s talk, please see below.

The mathematical and scientific accomplishments of Archimedes are impressive in their scope, depth and detail, often anticipating the work of others by many centuries.  This seminar will be accessible to everyone, regardless of their background in mathematics, and should also be of interest to those who enjoy history, astronomy, physics and science in general.  All are welcome.

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 PM.

“Archimedes: The Sand Reckoner

“There are some, King Gelon, who believe that the number of the sand is infinite in multitude…” begins The Sand Reckoner, a 3rd-century BCE manuscript by Archimedes of Syracuse (287-212 BCE). Limited by Greek numerals, Archimedes sought a new number system capable of expressing quantities larger than the amount of sand that could fill up the universe. Of course, to do this, he had to first determine the size of the universe. The Sand Reckoner is significant not only for the extraordinary mathematics it contains, but also for its profound insights into the history of science. It cites the earliest account we have of a heliocentric solar system, contains adjustments for solar parallax and the anatomy of a human eye, and is regarded as the world’s first research-expository paper. This seminar showcases Archimedes’ genius via a detailed analysis of The Sand Reckoner, demonstrating his place as the greatest mathematician of antiquity.

April Mathematics Seminar

April 10, 2018

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its last Mathematics Seminar of 2017-2018 on Tuesday, April 17, 3:00-4:00 PM in 103 Cook.

Our speaker, former GRCC student and current GRCC tutor Jeff Powers, will discuss the mathematics and science of Archimedes.  For the title and abstract of Jeff’s talk, please see below.

The mathematical and scientific accomplishments of Archimedes are impressive in their scope, depth and detail, often anticipating the work of others by many centuries.  This seminar will be accessible to everyone, regardless of their background in mathematics, and should also be of interest to those who enjoy history, astronomy, physics and science in general.  All are welcome.

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 PM.

“Archimedes: The Sand Reckoner

“There are some, King Gelon, who believe that the number of the sand is infinite in multitude…” begins The Sand Reckoner, a 3rd-century BCE manuscript by Archimedes of Syracuse (287-212 BCE). Limited by Greek numerals, Archimedes sought a new number system capable of expressing quantities larger than the amount of sand that could fill up the universe. Of course, to do this, he had to first determine the size of the universe. The Sand Reckoner is significant not only for the extraordinary mathematics it contains, but also for its profound insights into the history of science. It cites the earliest account we have of a heliocentric solar system, contains adjustments for solar parallax and the anatomy of a human eye, and is regarded as the world’s first research-expository paper. This seminar showcases Archimedes’ genius via a detailed analysis of The Sand Reckoner, demonstrating his place as the greatest mathematician of antiquity.

 

Mathematics Seminar is today

March 21, 2018

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its next Mathematics Seminar on Wednesday, March 21, 3:00-4:00 PM in 515 Cook.

Our speaker, former GRCC student and current GRCC tutor Katrina Teunis, will discuss mathematics as a language.  For the title and abstract of Katrina’s talk, please see below.

When discussions of a “universal language” arise, mathematics is usually at or near the top of the list.  But at the same time, many people admit that they don’t understand mathematics very well, and some may go on to say that they don’t like it very much.  In her presentation Karina will endeavor to show that treating mathematics as a language may make it more understandable, and, by extension, more likable.  No mathematics background is needed for this talk, and, as always, everyone is welcome!

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 PM.

The Language of Mathematics

Have you ever joked about math being a language you don’t understand? Have you ever wondered what the purpose was in learning algebra when you have absolutely no plans to use math in your future careers? Well, what if math really is a language, and treating it as one could both help you understand mathematics and why it applies to your daily life? Seeing math as the language it is can open the door to understanding why math works the way it does and how it is more than just manipulating numbers.  This talk will answer the question “is math a language” and address how viewing math in this way will improve your ability to work with numbers, use logic in your daily life, and truly understand mathematics.

Mathematics Seminar looks at mathematics as language

March 20, 2018

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its next Mathematics Seminar on Wednesday, March 21, 3:00-4:00 PM in 515 Cook.

Our speaker, former GRCC student and current GRCC tutor Katrina Teunis, will discuss mathematics as a language.  For the title and abstract of Katrina’s talk, please see below.

When discussions of a “universal language” arise, mathematics is usually at or near the top of the list.  But at the same time, many people admit that they don’t understand mathematics very well, and some may go on to say that they don’t like it very much.  In her presentation Karina will endeavor to show that treating mathematics as a language may make it more understandable, and, by extension, more likable.  No mathematics background is needed for this talk, and, as always, everyone is welcome!

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 PM.

The Language of Mathematics

Have you ever joked about math being a language you don’t understand? Have you ever wondered what the purpose was in learning algebra when you have absolutely no plans to use math in your future careers? Well, what if math really is a language, and treating it as one could both help you understand mathematics and why it applies to your daily life? Seeing math as the language it is can open the door to understanding why math works the way it does and how it is more than just manipulating numbers.  This talk will answer the question “is math a language” and address how viewing math in this way will improve your ability to work with numbers, use logic in your daily life, and truly understand mathematics.

GRCC alumna Katrina Teunis to lead Mathematics Seminar

March 14, 2018

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its next Mathematics Seminar on Wednesday, March 21, 3:00-4:00 PM in 515 Cook.

Our speaker, former GRCC student and current GRCC tutor Katrina Teunis, will discuss mathematics as a language.  For the title and abstract of Katrina’s talk, please see below.

When discussions of a “universal language” arise, mathematics is usually at or near the top of the list.  But at the same time, many people admit that they don’t understand mathematics very well, and some may go on to say that they don’t like it very much.  In her presentation Karina will endeavor to show that treating mathematics as a language may make it more understandable, and, by extension, more likable.  No mathematics background is needed for this talk, and, as always, everyone is welcome!

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 PM.

The Language of Mathematics

Have you ever joked about math being a language you don’t understand? Have you ever wondered what the purpose was in learning algebra when you have absolutely no plans to use math in your future careers? Well, what if math really is a language, and treating it as one could both help you understand mathematics and why it applies to your daily life? Seeing math as the language it is can open the door to understanding why math works the way it does and how it is more than just manipulating numbers.  This talk will answer the question “is math a language” and address how viewing math in this way will improve your ability to work with numbers, use logic in your daily life, and truly understand mathematics.

Student Fisher Pham to lead Mathematics Seminar

February 13, 2018

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its next Mathematics Seminar on Wednesday, February 14, 3:00-4:00 PM in 515 Cook.

Our speaker, GRCC student Fisher Pham, will discuss mathematics related to solving Rubik’s Cube.  For the title and abstract of Fisher’s talk, please see below.

If you’ve ever solved Rubik’s Cube, attempted to solve it, glanced at it occasionally as it gathered dust on a shelf, or simply watched in amazement as someone else solved it in a few seconds, there will much of interest in this seminar.  As always, everyone is welcome!

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 PM.

God’s Algorithm: A Simple Solution for the Rubik’s Cube

The Rubik’s Cube–a puzzle that seems impossible to solve, yet some have managed to solve it in mere seconds. Whether you know how to solve it or if you’ve spent hours twisting and turning it to no avail, you might have wondered, “Is there a simple pattern that I could repeat over and over to eventually solve the Rubik’s cube?” This hypothetical pattern is called “God’s Algorithm”. In this talk, we will find out if “God’s Algorithm” exists and discuss other mathematical aspects of the Rubik’s Cube.

Mathematics Seminar looks at Rubik’s Cube, ‘God’s Algorithm’

February 7, 2018

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its next Mathematics Seminar on Wednesday, February 14, 3:00-4:00 PM in 515 Cook.

Our speaker, GRCC student Fisher Pham, will discuss mathematics related to solving Rubik’s Cube.  For the title and abstract of Fisher’s talk, please see below.

If you’ve ever solved Rubik’s Cube, attempted to solve it, glanced at it occasionally as it gathered dust on a shelf, or simply watched in amazement as someone else solved it in a few seconds, there will much of interest in this seminar.  As always, everyone is welcome!

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 PM.

God’s Algorithm: A Simple Solution for the Rubik’s Cube

The Rubik’s Cube–a puzzle that seems impossible to solve, yet some have managed to solve it in mere seconds. Whether you know how to solve it or if you’ve spent hours twisting and turning it to no avail, you might have wondered, “Is there a simple pattern that I could repeat over and over to eventually solve the Rubik’s cube?” This hypothetical pattern is called “God’s Algorithm”. In this talk, we will find out if “God’s Algorithm” exists and discuss other mathematical aspects of the Rubik’s Cube.

Mathematics Seminar is today

January 18, 2018

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its first Mathematics Seminar of 2018 on Thursday, January 18, 3:00-4:00 PM in 103 Cook.

Our speaker, GVSU Mathematics Instructor Michael Santana, will discuss mathematics underlying the sometimes vexing problem of seating arrangements at tables.  For the title and abstract of Michael’s talk, please see below.

Very little mathematics background is needed to appreciate this talk, making it accessible to a wide range of students and faculty.  All are welcome!

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 PM.

A graph theory approach to seating people at parties

You’re hosting a party with at least three people, and you want to seat everyone around a large table so that each person is friends with the person on their left and the person on their right. How do you know when you can do this? This seemingly innocent question turns out to be quite difficult to answer! On the other hand, the question becomes (MUCH) easier when you don’t require that everyone be seated at the table (so you’re okay with some people standing around). In this talk we’ll consider both questions (focusing mainly on the second question), look at several extensions of these questions, and see how doing research in mathematics can be like playing the wooden block game, Jenga.

 

 

Michael Santana to lead Mathematics Seminar on Jan. 18

January 17, 2018

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its first Mathematics Seminar of 2018 on Thursday, January 18, 3:00-4:00 PM in 103 Cook.

Our speaker, GVSU Mathematics Instructor Michael Santana, will discuss mathematics underlying the sometimes vexing problem of seating arrangements at tables.  For the title and abstract of Michael’s talk, please see below.

Very little mathematics background is needed to appreciate this talk, making it accessible to a wide range of students and faculty.  All are welcome!

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 PM.

A graph theory approach to seating people at parties

You’re hosting a party with at least three people, and you want to seat everyone around a large table so that each person is friends with the person on their left and the person on their right. How do you know when you can do this? This seemingly innocent question turns out to be quite difficult to answer! On the other hand, the question becomes (MUCH) easier when you don’t require that everyone be seated at the table (so you’re okay with some people standing around). In this talk we’ll consider both questions (focusing mainly on the second question), look at several extensions of these questions, and see how doing research in mathematics can be like playing the wooden block game, Jenga.

 

 

Mathematics Seminar to look at seating arrangements

January 11, 2018

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its first Mathematics Seminar of 2018 on Thursday, January 18, 3:00-4:00 PM in 103 Cook.

Our speaker, GVSU Mathematics Instructor Michael Santana, will discuss mathematics underlying the sometimes vexing problem of seating arrangements at tables.  For the title and abstract of Michael’s talk, please see below.

Very little mathematics background is needed to appreciate this talk, making it accessible to a wide range of students and faculty.  All are welcome!

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 PM.

A graph theory approach to seating people at parties

You’re hosting a party with at least three people, and you want to seat everyone around a large table so that each person is friends with the person on their left and the person on their right. How do you know when you can do this? This seemingly innocent question turns out to be quite difficult to answer! On the other hand, the question becomes (MUCH) easier when you don’t require that everyone be seated at the table (so you’re okay with some people standing around). In this talk we’ll consider both questions (focusing mainly on the second question), look at several extensions of these questions, and see how doing research in mathematics can be like playing the wooden block game, Jenga.

 

 

Mathematics Seminar is today

December 6, 2017

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its final Mathematics Seminar of 2017 on Wednesday, December 6, 3:00-4:00 PM in 103 Cook.

Our speaker, GRCC Mathematics Instructor Alejandro Saldivar, will discuss a seemingly simple topic from geometry that leads to intriguing examples and unexpected consequences. For the title and abstract of Alejandro’s talk, please see below.

This presentation will appeal to a wide range of students and faculty; no previous mathematics background is required. All are welcome!

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 PM.

Reassembling Pieces of a Figure to Form Other Ones

Given two figures with the same area, can we always cut one into pieces so the pieces can be reassembled to form the second figure?  We investigate this question and provide some very interesting examples. This talk is suitable for an audience with a wide range of math backgrounds.

Alejandro Saldivar to present Mathematics Seminar

December 5, 2017

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its final Mathematics Seminar of 2017 on Wednesday, December 6, 3:00-4:00 PM in 103 Cook.

Our speaker, GRCC Mathematics Instructor Alejandro Saldivar, will discuss a seemingly simple topic from geometry that leads to intriguing examples and unexpected consequences. For the title and abstract of Alejandro’s talk, please see below.

This presentation will appeal to a wide range of students and faculty; no previous mathematics background is required. All are welcome!

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 PM.

Reassembling Pieces of a Figure to Form Other Ones

Given two figures with the same area, can we always cut one into pieces so the pieces can be reassembled to form the second figure?  We investigate this question and provide some very interesting examples. This talk is suitable for an audience with a wide range of math backgrounds.

Mathematics Seminar looks at geometry figures

November 29, 2017

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its final Mathematics Seminar of 2017 on Wednesday, December 6, 3:00-4:00 PM in 103 Cook.

Our speaker, GRCC Mathematics Instructor Alejandro Saldivar, will discuss a seemingly simple topic from geometry that leads to intriguing examples and unexpected consequences. For the title and abstract of Alejandro’s talk, please see below.

This presentation will appeal to a wide range of students and faculty; no previous mathematics background is required. All are welcome!

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 PM.

Reassembling Pieces of a Figure to Form Other Ones

Given two figures with the same area, can we always cut one into pieces so the pieces can be reassembled to form the second figure?  We investigate this question and provide some very interesting examples. This talk is suitable for an audience with a wide range of math backgrounds.

Mathematics Seminar is today

November 15, 2017

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its next Mathematics Seminar on Wednesday, November 15, 3:30-4:30 PM in 103 Cook.

Our speaker, GRCC Mathematics Instructor Meghan VanderMale, will discuss how mathematics has been used to determine if U.S. Congressional districts have been gerrymandered.  For the title and abstract of Meghan’s talk, please see below.

This timely presentation will appeal to a wide range of students and faculty; no previous mathematics background is required.  All are welcome!

Pop and cookies will be served at 3:14 PM. You can watch a livestream of this presentation on Facebook.

Measuring Fairness: Beyond the “Eyeball Test” for Detecting Gerrymandering

At the beginning of October, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments for the case of Gill v Whitford. It is one of the only cases on partisan gerrymandering to reach the Supreme Court and it challenges the redistricting of Wisconsin following its 2010 census. In this landmark case, a relatively simple mathematical measure called the efficiency gap was featured. This talk will discuss the efficiency gap and explore what exactly it measures and where it may fall short of being a miracle gerrymander measure. We will also discuss other mathematical measures that apply to gerrymandering cases and the challenges of using them in legal settings. The mathematics involved is very accessible and requires no previous math background, nor is it necessary to know much about gerrymandering. The talk will be of particular interest to students of mathematics, government, political science, law, and statistics. You are encouraged (though not required) to bring a laptop or iPad as a portion of the talk will have computer interactive elements.