Posted tagged ‘Mathematics Seminar’

Mathematics Seminar is today

January 18, 2018

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its first Mathematics Seminar of 2018 on Thursday, January 18, 3:00-4:00 PM in 103 Cook.

Our speaker, GVSU Mathematics Instructor Michael Santana, will discuss mathematics underlying the sometimes vexing problem of seating arrangements at tables.  For the title and abstract of Michael’s talk, please see below.

Very little mathematics background is needed to appreciate this talk, making it accessible to a wide range of students and faculty.  All are welcome!

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 PM.

A graph theory approach to seating people at parties

You’re hosting a party with at least three people, and you want to seat everyone around a large table so that each person is friends with the person on their left and the person on their right. How do you know when you can do this? This seemingly innocent question turns out to be quite difficult to answer! On the other hand, the question becomes (MUCH) easier when you don’t require that everyone be seated at the table (so you’re okay with some people standing around). In this talk we’ll consider both questions (focusing mainly on the second question), look at several extensions of these questions, and see how doing research in mathematics can be like playing the wooden block game, Jenga.

 

 

Michael Santana to lead Mathematics Seminar on Jan. 18

January 17, 2018

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its first Mathematics Seminar of 2018 on Thursday, January 18, 3:00-4:00 PM in 103 Cook.

Our speaker, GVSU Mathematics Instructor Michael Santana, will discuss mathematics underlying the sometimes vexing problem of seating arrangements at tables.  For the title and abstract of Michael’s talk, please see below.

Very little mathematics background is needed to appreciate this talk, making it accessible to a wide range of students and faculty.  All are welcome!

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 PM.

A graph theory approach to seating people at parties

You’re hosting a party with at least three people, and you want to seat everyone around a large table so that each person is friends with the person on their left and the person on their right. How do you know when you can do this? This seemingly innocent question turns out to be quite difficult to answer! On the other hand, the question becomes (MUCH) easier when you don’t require that everyone be seated at the table (so you’re okay with some people standing around). In this talk we’ll consider both questions (focusing mainly on the second question), look at several extensions of these questions, and see how doing research in mathematics can be like playing the wooden block game, Jenga.

 

 

Mathematics Seminar to look at seating arrangements

January 11, 2018

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its first Mathematics Seminar of 2018 on Thursday, January 18, 3:00-4:00 PM in 103 Cook.

Our speaker, GVSU Mathematics Instructor Michael Santana, will discuss mathematics underlying the sometimes vexing problem of seating arrangements at tables.  For the title and abstract of Michael’s talk, please see below.

Very little mathematics background is needed to appreciate this talk, making it accessible to a wide range of students and faculty.  All are welcome!

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 PM.

A graph theory approach to seating people at parties

You’re hosting a party with at least three people, and you want to seat everyone around a large table so that each person is friends with the person on their left and the person on their right. How do you know when you can do this? This seemingly innocent question turns out to be quite difficult to answer! On the other hand, the question becomes (MUCH) easier when you don’t require that everyone be seated at the table (so you’re okay with some people standing around). In this talk we’ll consider both questions (focusing mainly on the second question), look at several extensions of these questions, and see how doing research in mathematics can be like playing the wooden block game, Jenga.

 

 

Mathematics Seminar is today

December 6, 2017

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its final Mathematics Seminar of 2017 on Wednesday, December 6, 3:00-4:00 PM in 103 Cook.

Our speaker, GRCC Mathematics Instructor Alejandro Saldivar, will discuss a seemingly simple topic from geometry that leads to intriguing examples and unexpected consequences. For the title and abstract of Alejandro’s talk, please see below.

This presentation will appeal to a wide range of students and faculty; no previous mathematics background is required. All are welcome!

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 PM.

Reassembling Pieces of a Figure to Form Other Ones

Given two figures with the same area, can we always cut one into pieces so the pieces can be reassembled to form the second figure?  We investigate this question and provide some very interesting examples. This talk is suitable for an audience with a wide range of math backgrounds.

Alejandro Saldivar to present Mathematics Seminar

December 5, 2017

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its final Mathematics Seminar of 2017 on Wednesday, December 6, 3:00-4:00 PM in 103 Cook.

Our speaker, GRCC Mathematics Instructor Alejandro Saldivar, will discuss a seemingly simple topic from geometry that leads to intriguing examples and unexpected consequences. For the title and abstract of Alejandro’s talk, please see below.

This presentation will appeal to a wide range of students and faculty; no previous mathematics background is required. All are welcome!

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 PM.

Reassembling Pieces of a Figure to Form Other Ones

Given two figures with the same area, can we always cut one into pieces so the pieces can be reassembled to form the second figure?  We investigate this question and provide some very interesting examples. This talk is suitable for an audience with a wide range of math backgrounds.

Mathematics Seminar looks at geometry figures

November 29, 2017

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its final Mathematics Seminar of 2017 on Wednesday, December 6, 3:00-4:00 PM in 103 Cook.

Our speaker, GRCC Mathematics Instructor Alejandro Saldivar, will discuss a seemingly simple topic from geometry that leads to intriguing examples and unexpected consequences. For the title and abstract of Alejandro’s talk, please see below.

This presentation will appeal to a wide range of students and faculty; no previous mathematics background is required. All are welcome!

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 PM.

Reassembling Pieces of a Figure to Form Other Ones

Given two figures with the same area, can we always cut one into pieces so the pieces can be reassembled to form the second figure?  We investigate this question and provide some very interesting examples. This talk is suitable for an audience with a wide range of math backgrounds.

Mathematics Seminar is today

November 15, 2017

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its next Mathematics Seminar on Wednesday, November 15, 3:30-4:30 PM in 103 Cook.

Our speaker, GRCC Mathematics Instructor Meghan VanderMale, will discuss how mathematics has been used to determine if U.S. Congressional districts have been gerrymandered.  For the title and abstract of Meghan’s talk, please see below.

This timely presentation will appeal to a wide range of students and faculty; no previous mathematics background is required.  All are welcome!

Pop and cookies will be served at 3:14 PM. You can watch a livestream of this presentation on Facebook.

Measuring Fairness: Beyond the “Eyeball Test” for Detecting Gerrymandering

At the beginning of October, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments for the case of Gill v Whitford. It is one of the only cases on partisan gerrymandering to reach the Supreme Court and it challenges the redistricting of Wisconsin following its 2010 census. In this landmark case, a relatively simple mathematical measure called the efficiency gap was featured. This talk will discuss the efficiency gap and explore what exactly it measures and where it may fall short of being a miracle gerrymander measure. We will also discuss other mathematical measures that apply to gerrymandering cases and the challenges of using them in legal settings. The mathematics involved is very accessible and requires no previous math background, nor is it necessary to know much about gerrymandering. The talk will be of particular interest to students of mathematics, government, political science, law, and statistics. You are encouraged (though not required) to bring a laptop or iPad as a portion of the talk will have computer interactive elements.

Meghan VanderMale to present Mathematics Seminar

November 14, 2017

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its next Mathematics Seminar on Wednesday, November 15, 3:30-4:30 PM in 103 Cook.

Our speaker, GRCC Mathematics Instructor Meghan VanderMale, will discuss how mathematics has been used to determine if U.S. Congressional districts have been gerrymandered.  For the title and abstract of Meghan’s talk, please see below.

This timely presentation will appeal to a wide range of students and faculty; no previous mathematics background is required.  All are welcome!

Pop and cookies will be served at 3:14 PM.

Measuring Fairness: Beyond the “Eyeball Test” for Detecting Gerrymandering

At the beginning of October, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments for the case of Gill v Whitford. It is one of the only cases on partisan gerrymandering to reach the Supreme Court and it challenges the redistricting of Wisconsin following its 2010 census. In this landmark case, a relatively simple mathematical measure called the efficiency gap was featured. This talk will discuss the efficiency gap and explore what exactly it measures and where it may fall short of being a miracle gerrymander measure. We will also discuss other mathematical measures that apply to gerrymandering cases and the challenges of using them in legal settings. The mathematics involved is very accessible and requires no previous math background, nor is it necessary to know much about gerrymandering. The talk will be of particular interest to students of mathematics, government, political science, law, and statistics. You are encouraged (though not required) to bring a laptop or iPad as a portion of the talk will have computer interactive elements.

Mathematics Seminar looks at gerrymandering

November 8, 2017

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its next Mathematics Seminar on Wednesday, November 15, 3:30-4:30 p.m. in 103 Cook.

Our speaker, GRCC mathematics instructor Meghan VanderMale, will discuss how mathematics has been used to determine if U.S. Congressional districts have been gerrymandered.  For the title and abstract of Meghan’s talk, please see below.

This timely presentation will appeal to a wide range of students and faculty; no previous mathematics background is required.  All are welcome!

Pop and cookies will be served at 3:14 PM.

Measuring Fairness: Beyond the “Eyeball Test” for Detecting Gerrymandering

At the beginning of October, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments for the case of Gill v Whitford. It is one of the only cases on partisan gerrymandering to reach the Supreme Court and it challenges the redistricting of Wisconsin following its 2010 census. In this landmark case, a relatively simple mathematical measure called the efficiency gap was featured. This talk will discuss the efficiency gap and explore what exactly it measures and where it may fall short of being a miracle gerrymander measure. We will also discuss other mathematical measures that apply to gerrymandering cases and the challenges of using them in legal settings. The mathematics involved is very accessible and requires no previous math background, nor is it necessary to know much about gerrymandering. The talk will be of particular interest to students of mathematics, government, political science, law, and statistics. You are encouraged (though not required) to bring a laptop or iPad as a portion of the talk will have computer interactive elements.

Mathematics Seminar today in Cook

October 18, 2017

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its October Mathematics Seminar today from 3-4 p.m. in 103 Cook.

This presentation will appeal to a wide range of students and faculty.  Much of it requires no understanding of mathematics beyond arithmetic.  All are welcome!

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 p.m.

Our speaker, GRCC Mathematics Instructor Andrea Hayes, will discuss division by zero in various forms of mathematics from basic arithmetic to higher-level mathematics.  For the title and abstract of Andrea’s talk, please see below:

Undefined

Division by zero is often confusing and misinterpreted.  Is (1/0) undefined or infinity?   The answer often depends on who you ask and can lead to lively discussions, even arguments.  The source of such discussions usually resides in the difference between actual division by 0 and what happens when the denominator approaches zero.  This talk will provide an in-depth look at the complexity of division by zero at various levels of mathematics.

 

 

 

October 18 Mathematics Seminar

October 17, 2017

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its October Mathematics Seminar this Wednesday, October 18, from 3-4 p.m. in 103 Cook.

This presentation will appeal to a wide range of students and faculty.  Much of it requires no understanding of mathematics beyond arithmetic.  All are welcome!

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 p.m.

Our speaker, GRCC Mathematics Instructor Andrea Hayes, will discuss division by zero in various forms of mathematics from basic arithmetic to higher-level mathematics.  For the title and abstract of Andrea’s talk, please see below:

Undefined

Division by zero is often confusing and misinterpreted.  Is (1/0) undefined or infinity?   The answer often depends on who you ask and can lead to lively discussions, even arguments.  The source of such discussions usually resides in the difference between actual division by 0 and what happens when the denominator approaches zero.  This talk will provide an in-depth look at the complexity of division by zero at various levels of mathematics.

 

 

 

October Mathematics Seminar

October 11, 2017

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its October Mathematics Seminar on Wednesday, October 18, from 3-4 p.m. in 103 Cook.

Our speaker, GRCC Mathematics Instructor Andrea Hayes, will discuss division by zero in various forms of mathematics from basic arithmetic to higher-level mathematics.  For the title and abstract of Andrea’s talk, please see below.

This presentation will appeal to a wide range of students and faculty.  Much of it requires no understanding of mathematics beyond arithmetic.  All are welcome!

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 p.m.

Undefined

Division by zero is often confusing and misinterpreted.  Is (1/0) undefined or infinity?   The answer often depends on who you ask and can lead to lively discussions, even arguments.  The source of such discussions usually resides in the difference between actual division by 0 and what happens when the denominator approaches zero.  This talk will provide an in-depth look at the complexity of division by zero at various levels of mathematics.

 

 

 

Mathematics Seminar to be held today

September 21, 2017

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its first Mathematics Seminar of the 2017-2018 academic year on Thursday, September 21, 3:00-4:00 p.m. in 101 Cook.  Our speaker will be Ph.D. student Javier Ronquillo.  His topic is the mathematics of mosaics.  The title and abstract may be found below.

Sufficient background for this talk requires nothing more than an appreciation of beauty and a willingness to see how mathematics may be used in its creation.  Everyone is encouraged to attend.

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 p.m.

 An investigation of angles, polygons and mosaics

Have you noticed that the New Year’s Eve ball that comes down every year in Times Square is not perfectly round? It is really made out of a bunch of smaller triangles! Could we make a ball like this using just stop signs? Have you noticed that soccer balls are hybrids of pentagons and hexagons? Could we do a hybrid ball with stop signs and triangles?

All these questions have to do with arranging regular polygons (these arrangements need not form a ball; for example, the polygons could also be sitting on a wall). We will call one of these kinds of arrangements a mosaic. Throughout history mosaics have been some of the most beautiful pieces of art, and mathematics is used to help create their harmony and beauty.

In this talk we will explore the questions listed above and many more. This material is accessible to everyone and provides a great opportunity to see math and art interact.

Mathematics Seminar set for September 21

September 20, 2017

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its first Mathematics Seminar of the 2017-2018 academic year on Thursday, September 21, 3:00-4:00 p.m. in 101 Cook.  Our speaker will be Ph.D. student Javier Ronquillo.  His topic is the mathematics of mosaics.  The title and abstract may be found below.

Sufficient background for this talk requires nothing more than an appreciation of beauty and a willingness to see how mathematics may be used in its creation.  Everyone is encouraged to attend.

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 p.m.

 An investigation of angles, polygons and mosaics

Have you noticed that the New Year’s Eve ball that comes down every year in Times Square is not perfectly round? It is really made out of a bunch of smaller triangles! Could we make a ball like this using just stop signs? Have you noticed that soccer balls are hybrids of pentagons and hexagons? Could we do a hybrid ball with stop signs and triangles?

All these questions have to do with arranging regular polygons (these arrangements need not form a ball; for example, the polygons could also be sitting on a wall). We will call one of these kinds of arrangements a mosaic. Throughout history mosaics have been some of the most beautiful pieces of art, and mathematics is used to help create their harmony and beauty.

In this talk we will explore the questions listed above and many more. This material is accessible to everyone and provides a great opportunity to see math and art interact.

Mathematics Seminar looks at mosaics

September 14, 2017

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its first Mathematics Seminar of the 2017-2018 academic year on Thursday, September 21, 3:00-4:00 p.m. in 101 Cook.  Our speaker will be Ph.D. student Javier Ronquillo.  His topic is the mathematics of mosaics.  The title and abstract may be found below.

Sufficient background for this talk requires nothing more than an appreciation of beauty and a willingness to see how mathematics may be used in its creation.  Everyone is encouraged to attend.

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 p.m.

 An investigation of angles, polygons and mosaics

Have you noticed that the New Year’s Eve ball that comes down every year in Times Square is not perfectly round? It is really made out of a bunch of smaller triangles! Could we make a ball like this using just stop signs? Have you noticed that soccer balls are hybrids of pentagons and hexagons? Could we do a hybrid ball with stop signs and triangles?

All these questions have to do with arranging regular polygons (these arrangements need not form a ball; for example, the polygons could also be sitting on a wall). We will call one of these kinds of arrangements a mosaic. Throughout history mosaics have been some of the most beautiful pieces of art, and mathematics is used to help create their harmony and beauty.

In this talk we will explore the questions listed above and many more. This material is accessible to everyone and provides a great opportunity to see math and art interact.