Posted tagged ‘Mathematics’

GRCC Mathematics Seminar TODAY in Cook 213

November 13, 2018

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is hosting its November Mathematics Seminar TODAY, November 13, from 2:30-3:30 p.m. in 213 Cook.

This month’s seminar will be lead by former GRCC student Katrina Teunis. Ms. Teunis will discuss her research on mathematical patterns in the folding of RNA.

Recent research in mathematical biology includes areas such as genomics, biochemistry and cell biology, heart physiology, kidney function, and protein folding.  Everyone is welcome!

Refreshments will be served at 2:15 p.m.

 

The Math Behind the Foldability of RNA

“This summer I was given funding to do some undergraduate math research on the mathematical patterns in how RNA folds. RNA, much like DNA, is made up of four building blocks called nucleotides: Adenine, Guanine, Cytosine, and Uracil. These nucleotides form a string that likes to fold in on itself and bond together – Adenine with Uracil and Guanine with Cytosine. So, the order and number of nucleotides present will determine how many ways the string of RNA can fold. By assigning these properties to letters, we can study this in a general context. Doing this I was able to find several new ways of determining how many times a string will fold as well as how to build a string with a specific number of foldings. I was also able to find or strengthen connections between RNA and other areas of mathematics. In this talk, I will walk through how RNA folds, what I found in my research, and how RNA connects to other areas of mathematics. This research was funded by the Modified Student Summer Scholars Program from the Office of Undergraduate Research at Grand Valley State University.”

GRCC Mathematics Seminar tomorrow in Cook 213

November 12, 2018

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is hosting its November Mathematics Seminar TOMORROW, November 13, from 2:30-3:30 p.m. in 213 Cook.

Our speaker, former GRCC student Katrina Teunis, will discuss her research on mathematical patterns in the folding of RNA.

Recent research in mathematical biology includes areas such as genomics, biochemistry and cell biology, heart physiology, kidney function, and protein folding.  Everyone is welcome!

Refreshments will be served at 2:15 p.m.

 

The Math Behind the Foldability of RNA

“This summer I was given funding to do some undergraduate math research on the mathematical patterns in how RNA folds. RNA, much like DNA, is made up of four building blocks called nucleotides: Adenine, Guanine, Cytosine, and Uracil. These nucleotides form a string that likes to fold in on itself and bond together – Adenine with Uracil and Guanine with Cytosine. So, the order and number of nucleotides present will determine how many ways the string of RNA can fold. By assigning these properties to letters, we can study this in a general context. Doing this I was able to find several new ways of determining how many times a string will fold as well as how to build a string with a specific number of foldings. I was also able to find or strengthen connections between RNA and other areas of mathematics. In this talk, I will walk through how RNA folds, what I found in my research, and how RNA connects to other areas of mathematics. This research was funded by the Modified Student Summer Scholars Program from the Office of Undergraduate Research at Grand Valley State University.”

GRCC’s November Mathematics Seminar next Tuesday in Cook 213

November 6, 2018

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its next Mathematics Seminar on Tuesday, November 13, from 2:30-3:30 p.m. in 213 Cook.

November’s seminar will be lead by former GRCC student Katrina Teunis. Ms. Teunis will discuss her research on mathematical patterns in the folding of RNA.

Recent research in mathematical biology includes areas such as genomics, biochemistry and cell biology, heart physiology, kidney function, and protein folding.  Everyone is welcome!

Refreshments will be served at 2:15 p.m.

 

The Math Behind the Foldability of RNA

“This summer I was given funding to do some undergraduate math research on the mathematical patterns in how RNA folds. RNA, much like DNA, is made up of four building blocks called nucleotides: Adenine, Guanine, Cytosine, and Uracil. These nucleotides form a string that likes to fold in on itself and bond together – Adenine with Uracil and Guanine with Cytosine. So, the order and number of nucleotides present will determine how many ways the string of RNA can fold. By assigning these properties to letters, we can study this in a general context. Doing this I was able to find several new ways of determining how many times a string will fold as well as how to build a string with a specific number of foldings. I was also able to find or strengthen connections between RNA and other areas of mathematics. In this talk, I will walk through how RNA folds, what I found in my research, and how RNA connects to other areas of mathematics. This research was funded by the Modified Student Summer Scholars Program from the Office of Undergraduate Research at Grand Valley State University.”

TODAY: Mathematics Seminar on Islamic design in Cook 102

October 30, 2018

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its next Mathematics Seminar TODAY, October 30, 3-4 p.m. in 102 Cook.

Our speaker is Rebin Muhammad from Ohio University, presenting on the mathematical symmetries in traditional Islamic designs. The variety of symmetries found in Islamic geometric patterns contributes to beautiful works of art and a wealth of opportunities for interesting mathematical explorations.  Join us for a presentation that will appeal to a general audience – all are welcome!

Refreshments will be served at 2:45 p.m.

 

Symmetries in the Alhambra

An Islamic geometric pattern is a two-dimensional wallpaper that is created by only using a compass and ruler. The history of Islamic geometric patterns dates back to the 8th century and can been seen in most Islamic countries, where it is used in decorating the walls of buildings and mosques. We will explore some of these patterns that are located in Alhambra (and other places) and see why they are mathematically interesting.

GRCC Mathematics Seminar tomorrow in Cook 102

October 29, 2018

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its next Mathematics Seminar tomorrow, October 30, 3-4 p.m. in 102 Cook.

Our speaker is Rebin Muhammad from Ohio University, presenting on the mathematical symmetries in traditional Islamic designs. The variety of symmetries found in Islamic geometric patterns contributes to beautiful works of art and a wealth of opportunities for interesting mathematical explorations.  Join us for a presentation that will appeal to a general audience – all are welcome!

Refreshments will be served at 2:45 p.m.

 

Symmetries in the Alhambra

An Islamic geometric pattern is a two-dimensional wallpaper that is created by only using a compass and ruler. The history of Islamic geometric patterns dates back to the 8th century and can been seen in most Islamic countries, where it is used in decorating the walls of buildings and mosques. We will explore some of these patterns that are located in Alhambra (and other places) and see why they are mathematically interesting.

GRCC’s October Mathematics Seminar next Tuesday in Cook 102

October 23, 2018

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its next Mathematics Seminar next week Tuesday, October 30, 3-4 p.m. in 102 Cook.

Our speaker is Rebin Muhammad from Ohio University, presenting on the mathematical symmetries in traditional Islamic designs. The variety of symmetries found in Islamic geometric patterns contributes to beautiful works of art and a wealth of opportunities for interesting mathematical explorations.  Join us for a presentation that will appeal to a general audience – all are welcome!

Refreshments will be served at 2:45 p.m.

 

Symmetries in the Alhambra

An Islamic geometric pattern is a two-dimensional wallpaper that is created by only using a compass and ruler. The history of Islamic geometric patterns dates back to the 8th century and can been seen in most Islamic countries, where it is used in decorating the walls of buildings and mosques. We will explore some of these patterns that are located in Alhambra (and other places) and see why they are mathematically interesting.

Mark your calendars for GRCC’s October Mathematics Seminar on Islamic design

October 19, 2018

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its next Mathematics Seminar on Tuesday, October 30, 3-4 p.m. in 102 Cook.

Our speaker is Rebin Muhammad from Ohio University, presenting on the mathematical symmetries in traditional Islamic designs. The variety of symmetries found in Islamic geometric patterns contributes to beautiful works of art and a wealth of opportunities for interesting mathematical explorations.  Join us for a presentation that will appeal to a general audience – all are welcome!

Refreshments will be served at 2:45 p.m.

 

Symmetries in the Alhambra

An Islamic geometric pattern is a two-dimensional wallpaper that is created by only using a compass and ruler. The history of Islamic geometric patterns dates back to the 8th century and can been seen in most Islamic countries, where it is used in decorating the walls of buildings and mosques. We will explore some of these patterns that are located in Alhambra (and other places) and see why they are mathematically interesting.

Two Students Awarded with the GRCC Faculty and Staff Centennial Scholarship

October 16, 2018

The GRCC Faculty and Staff Centennial Scholarship was created by the employees of the college in honor of GRCC’s 100th year celebration. Currently, two awards are given each year: one to an incoming student and the other to a returning student that has earned at least 12 credits at GRCC. These scholarships are awarded based on scholastic achievement as well as extracurricular involvement and community service. Applicants are also asked to submit a short essay explaining why they feel they deserve the scholarship. The recipients are then selected by a cross-college committee made up of representatives from each of the various employee groups (Faculty, Meet & Confer, CEBA, APSS, and Campus Police).

We are pleased to announce and congratulate the 2018-19 scholarship recipients for the GRCC Faculty and Staff Centennial Scholarship: Carley Hume and Rodney Van Lagen. Both have been awarded $1,000! Rodney is studying to become a secondary school teacher with a major in mathematics and a minor in English. Carley is currently enrolled in the Dental Assisting program at GRCC and plans on starting the Dental Hygiene program next fall.

We are very grateful to all the faculty and staff who have helped make these scholarships possible for Carley and Rodney. We wish these students all the best in their academic endeavors.

GRCC Mathematics Seminar Today in 114 Cook

September 26, 2018

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its first 2018-2019 Mathematics Seminar TODAY, September 26, from 3-4 p.m. in 114 Cook.

Our speaker is GRCC Mathematics Instructor John Dersch.

The study of mathematics has the potential to delight participants with beauty and surprising relationships. This talk will attempt to capture a small piece of mathematical wonder by connecting two ideas that appear to have nothing in common. Some knowledge of algebra will be useful, but, as always, everyone is welcome and encouraged to attend.

Refreshments will be served at 2:45 p.m.

 

Series and Probability DO Mix

Suppose you start adding 1 +     +      +    +  ¼  and you just keep going. As you add more and more terms, your answers will approach a unique number. It’s easy to approximate this number, but finding its exact value is a historically famous and fascinating problem.  This talk has two parts. In Part 1 we will show how Leonhard Euler first solved this famous problem in the 1730s. Part 2 reveals an unexpected appearance of Euler’s solution in our search for the answer to a question involving probability and relatively prime numbers.

GRCC Mathematics Seminar this Wednesday in Cook 114

September 25, 2018

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its first Mathematics Seminar of 2018-2019 tomorrow, September 26, from 3-4 p.m. in 114 Cook.

Our speaker is GRCC Mathematics Instructor John Dersch.

The study of mathematics has the potential to delight participants with beauty and surprising relationships. This talk will attempt to capture a small piece of mathematical wonder by connecting two ideas that appear to have nothing in common. Some knowledge of algebra will be useful, but, as always, everyone is welcome and encouraged to attend.

Refreshments will be served at 2:45 p.m.

 

Series and Probability DO Mix

Suppose you start adding 1 +     +      +    +  ¼  and you just keep going. As you add more and more terms, your answers will approach a unique number. It’s easy to approximate this number, but finding its exact value is a historically famous and fascinating problem.  This talk has two parts. In Part 1 we will show how Leonhard Euler first solved this famous problem in the 1730s. Part 2 reveals an unexpected appearance of Euler’s solution in our search for the answer to a question involving probability and relatively prime numbers.

Mark your calendars for GRCC’s September Mathematics Seminar

September 19, 2018

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its first Mathematics Seminar of 2018-2019 on Wednesday, September 26, 3-4 p.m. in 114 Cook.

Our speaker is GRCC Mathematics Instructor John Dersch.

The study of mathematics has the potential to delight participants with beauty and surprising relationships.  This talk will attempt to capture a small piece of mathematical wonder by connecting two ideas that appear to have nothing in common.  Some knowledge of algebra will be useful, but, as always, everyone is welcome and encouraged to attend.

Refreshments will be served at 2:45 p.m.

 

Series and Probability DO Mix

Suppose you start adding 1 +     +      +    +  ¼  and you just keep going.  As you add more and more terms, your answers will approach a unique number.  It’s easy to approximate this number, but finding its exact value is a historically famous and fascinating problem.  This talk has two parts.  In Part 1 we will show how Leonhard Euler first solved this famous problem in the 1730s.  Part 2 reveals an unexpected appearance of Euler’s solution in our search for the answer to a question involving probability and relatively prime numbers.

Happy Tau Day!

June 28, 2018

Happy Tau Day! Learn about tau and Tau Day in this GRCC video. Special thanks to Klaas Kwant and Noah DeSmit for producing the video.

Math Awareness Month contest winners

April 20, 2018

Thank you to all who participated in the Math Awareness Month Contest. Of all the correct entries, three students and three staff were randomly drawn to receive a prize. Special thanks to the GRCC Bookstore for donating prizes for students!

The student prize winners are:

  • Lauren Schulte
  • Nick Veltema
  • Samuel Johnson

The staff prize winners are:

  • Patricia Williams
  • Luke Ellison
  • Daniel Tjapkes

Math Awareness Month contest!

April 3, 2018

In celebration of April being Math Awareness Month, enter the Math Awareness Month Contest. You may win a prize! The contest is open to all GRCC students and staff. Pick up a copy of the contest from the Math Tutoring Lab on first floor Cook.  All contest entries are due by Monday, April 16.

Mathematics Seminar is today

March 21, 2018

The Grand Rapids Community College Mathematics Department is pleased to announce that it will host its next Mathematics Seminar on Wednesday, March 21, 3:00-4:00 PM in 515 Cook.

Our speaker, former GRCC student and current GRCC tutor Katrina Teunis, will discuss mathematics as a language.  For the title and abstract of Katrina’s talk, please see below.

When discussions of a “universal language” arise, mathematics is usually at or near the top of the list.  But at the same time, many people admit that they don’t understand mathematics very well, and some may go on to say that they don’t like it very much.  In her presentation Karina will endeavor to show that treating mathematics as a language may make it more understandable, and, by extension, more likable.  No mathematics background is needed for this talk, and, as always, everyone is welcome!

Pop and cookies will be served at 2:45 PM.

The Language of Mathematics

Have you ever joked about math being a language you don’t understand? Have you ever wondered what the purpose was in learning algebra when you have absolutely no plans to use math in your future careers? Well, what if math really is a language, and treating it as one could both help you understand mathematics and why it applies to your daily life? Seeing math as the language it is can open the door to understanding why math works the way it does and how it is more than just manipulating numbers.  This talk will answer the question “is math a language” and address how viewing math in this way will improve your ability to work with numbers, use logic in your daily life, and truly understand mathematics.